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1973 Porsche 911

Historic Cars

1973 Porsche 911
Historic Cars
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SH ID

23-1122009

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FEATURED BY SPEEDHOLICS

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In Stock

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France

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Dealer


Description

There are some cars that leave you breathless as soon as they are unveiled before your amazed eyes. The Porsche 911 is one of them, but in more than 50 years of existence, there are rare variants that have turned and still turn heads more than others. Among them, we can consider the 911 Carrera RS 2.7 and the more muscular RSR 2.8, a sacred monster of motor racing as aesthetic as it is powerful. Fans of the genre will also fondly remember the psychedelic liveries they were dressed in during competition in the 1970s. In 1973, one year after the introduction of the 911 Carrera RS 2.7, Porsche unveiled the 911 Carrera RSR 2.8, the first to carry the RSR badge. The 911 Carrera RSR 2.8 was a competition car and won several prestigious races in 1973... At Porsche, the 911 allows the brand to create a myth and forget the 356 of the early days, the car for customers looking for a sports car can also be used for racing, Porsche making "competition-customer cars" as the 911 R, T/R and other 911 ST. In 1972, the 911 Carrera RS 2.7 allows Porsche to homologate a new version to counter the BMW 3.0 CS and other Ford Capri running in Group 3, the civil version meeting an important success with more than 1,500 units sold, the car is also homologated for Group 4 As Group 4 is more permissive and allows some modifications, the Porsche 911 Carrera RS 2.7 is the basis for a new car for competition, the 911 Carrera RSR 2.8 (RSR for RennSport Racing), which was presented in 1973. In detail, the RSR received wider fenders, wider rims of 9 inches at the front and 11 inches at the rear, an oil cooler was mounted behind the front bumper, the suspension received larger torsion bars. On the body side, the car features the famous spoiler of the Carrera RS 2.7. The RSR is also lightened to the maximum with the use of composite materials for the body, Plexiglas for the glass. In the end, the car weighs only 840kg. On the engine side, the Carrera RSR 2.8 receives an evolution of the engine of the Carrera RS 2.7, whose displacement is increased to 2,808cm3 for a power of 309 hp. In detail, this engine receives a mechanical injection Bosch, dual ignition, and the engine is even lighter than that of the Carrera RS 2.7. It also hosts a five-speed transaxle, specially designed for the car. For the braking, Porsche engineers made a system using components from the 917. The 911 Carrera RSR 2.8 makes a stunning entry into motorsport by winning the 24 hours of Daytona 1973, against Ferrari, Matra and Mirage-Ford. The 911 Carrera RSR 2.8 went on to win numerous other races during the 1973 season, including the 12 Hours of Sebring and the Targa Florio, winning six of the nine races in the European GT Championship. As a competition car, the Porsche 911 Carrera RSR 2.8 received numerous upgrades during the 1973 season. Sold mainly to racing teams that could afford to pay 25,000 Deutschmarks (the price of a Carrera RS 2.7 and a basic 911), only 49 examples of the 911 Carrera RSR 2.8 were produced, which enabled the owner teams to perform well in the rankings for years. For the 1974 season, Porsche still evolves its car in 911 Carrera RSR 3.0, before the arrival of the 934 turbocharged ... Our Porsche 911 2.8L RSR was built on the basis of a 1973 911 2.4L E, between 2011 and 2014, on commission from its current owner. Construction and tuning were initially entrusted to the RS Autosport garage in Chalonvillars, then in 2014, when the garage closed, the car was taken over by Nicolas Suarez (ex-Renault F1 engine builder), who took charge of preparation with the technical support of Crubilé Sport. The car took part in a number of rallies between 2016 and 2019 with some very good results, as can be seen below. But none of this happened by chance... Let's go back some 50 years... the story begins in 1975 when the current owner, as part of the 'Premier Pas Dunlop' and the 'Coupe Renault Elf Gordini', made his first appearance in the small world of motor racing... He won the Cup in 1978, after some epic battles in which his quality as a driver and his tenacity were revealed to the general public. The years 79 and 80 saw him at the wheel of Formule Renault cars with the Elf and Motul teams, then in 1982 he took part in the French Production Car Championship with the Garage du Bac team. Despite a long break devoted to an intense professional activity, the motor racing virus was never cured. Many years later, he returned to his first love through historic racing... 20 years of racing at the highest level followed, with numerous podium finishes including several scratch victories in the Tour Auto... You will understand that our man is talented, passionate, and driven by a single goal: victory. This will be reflected in all the cars he will have built to pursue his Historic driver career. A meticulous quest for performance and perfection in compliance with the regulations of the period. Our car took part in many rallies between 2016 and 2019 with very good results: 2017 VHC RALLY CHAMPIONSHIP OF FRANCE Mont Blanc Rally: 4th Rallye du Var: 3rd Tour de Corse Historique: 4th 2018 FRENCH VHC RALLY CHAMPIONSHIP Antibes Rally: 3rd Mont Blanc Rally: 2nd Rallye du Var: 3rd French Rally Champion in GR4 2019 FRENCH RALLY CHAMPIONSHIP VHC Le Touquet Rally: 3rd Mont Blanc Rally: Winner Unfortunately, the 2019 season ended with the car running off the road at the Tour de Corse Historique... at low speed... the vagaries of rallying... The damage could only be assessed once the car had been completely dismantled. Nicolas Suarez began what was to be a thorough and meticulous rebuild. Once the hull was bare, it was taken to Matter France, where it was found that the central cell with the roll cage had not moved. It was therefore decided to repair the hull. Once again, the owner chose to strip the hull completely and then entrust it to his coachbuilder, where the hull was completely overhauled: set on marble, reinforcement of all the anchoring points (front undercarriage, rocker panels, etc.), the right-hand front wheel arch was replaced, as was the front face. The front wings are replaced, and the wing extensions are welded. The rear wings are unsoldered and replaced by new ones to which the wing extensions are welded. Once the assembly is complete, the hull will be shot-blasted and treated with cataphoresis. Nothing is left to chance! During the four months of bodywork, Nicolas Suarez overhauled the engine and Crubilé Sport overhauled the gearbox. The car is literally brand new, down to the smallest detail, including the electrical circuit, which was rebuilt using thermal fuses. After a tune-up on the Lurcy Levis circuit, it was off to the 2021 Tour de Corse. Unfortunately, poor quality petrol prematurely ruined any hopes of victory in the 2021 event. On the way to the shake down, the engine emitted an abnormal noise. The decision was taken to abandon and get back to work. Nicolas Suarez again takes charge of the dismantling. Liners, pistons and cylinder heads are replaced. The crankshaft is controlled, the cylinder heads are replaced by modified RSR double-ignition heads, and new bearings are fitted to Carillo connecting rods. All of this in an engine block conforming to the specs of the period, fitted with the famous "Petit vilebrequin" (small crankshaft)! At the end of 2022, the now period-specification 3L engine was run in on an engine dyno and put through its paces: the result was 322 hp at 7,600 rpm. Since then, our driver has decided to end his career in 2023. After several departures this year, this 2.8L RSR will be the last "toy" to leave his stable. Scrupulously prepared and maintained by Nicolas Suarez and the technical support of Crubile Sport, our car is ready to take to the track again. A large number of parts are included with the car.It will be delivered run-in, following a handover session in the presence of its current owner, who is as concerned as ever about the quality of the cars he entrusts to his successors. Are you looking for the ultimate Tour Auto weapon, also eligible for CER or next season's French Rally Championship? Delivered like new, with its FIA International HTP and up-to-date safety system. All you have to do is put your helmet on and fill up!